Our habit of the week is COURAGE! I think that this is my favorite habit, as it seems to spur all other habits. It just takes an ounce of courage to be a better version of ourselves and live life more fully. Courage is that extra step just outside of comfort that leads us to a more fulfilling life and unexpected victories. Courage builds character, stretches capacity, and changes lives. Expressing confidence in our children and helping them to understand that risk and failure are essential to success motivates personal development and defeats fear.
 
Look for opportunities to celebrate courage. Spotlight characters from books and movies who act courageous. Most importantly, affirm your child when he/she uses an ounce of courage and chooses to do the next right thing even when it is scary. The American spirit has always relied on courageous thinkers, adventurers, and entrepreneurs. Our children are the next generation of great Americans as long as we encourage them. As the Duke (John Wayne) used to say, “Courage is being scared to death and saddling up anyway”.
 
Help your child develop a courageous character this week by practicing the following ideas:
  • Heart – respectfully introduce yourself to a new acquaintance.
  • Mind – attempt a more difficult book or math problem.
  • Body – try a new sport or hobby.
  • Soul – discuss dreams and aspirations about the future and what courageous acts it takes to achieve those dreams!
 
“Courage is resistance to fear, mastery of fear – not absence of fear.” – Mark Twain
 
“Trust the still, small voice that says, ‘this might work and I’ll try it.’” – Diane Mariechild
 
Learning Links
 
Discipline Do’s & Don’ts
Doing the next right thing is simply an act of courage. One of the most successful parenting questions I have asked my children has been, “What is the next right thing to do?” In almost every case my child knew the answer and acted accordingly. I never had to say more. If there was uncertainty, I simply asked another question to guide the child toward actions that promote integrity and citizenship. If discipline is really about learning, then asking meaningful questions is a powerful tactic. The more our children come up with the answers on their own, the greater the thinking power we discipline into them. The next time you want to give your child an answer, stop and ask them the question instead.

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